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Saturday, August 4
until September 7
12:00am

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Squeaky Wheel’s exhibition programs, residencies and events are made possible with generous support by the County of Erie and County Executive Mark Poloncarz, the National Endowment of the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, and individual members, businesses, and supporters. Squeaky Wheel’s Animation Fest is sponsored by Villa Maria College’s Animation program. Support Squeaky by becoming a member or donating to us here.

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Screenings

Squeaky Wheel’s 15th Animation Fest!

Screening 1
Saturday, August 4, 12pm
at the Frank E. Merriweather Library

Screening 2
To be announced!

Screening 3
Friday, September 7, 7:30pm
at the Albright Knox Art Gallery

All screenings are free and open to the public!

Squeaky Wheel is proud to announce our 15th Animation Festival! This free, all-ages, family-friendly affair with the famous Squeaky edge is a showcase of short animated film, featuring a variety of techniques, from hand-made film to 3D animation. Guest curated by Savion “Ineil Quaran” Mingo (D.O.P.E. Collective), we are proud to present the biggest animation fest yet, with three screenings around the city of Buffalo, each with their own unique lineup of films. Make sure to attend all three screenings to see all the films!

Among the works featured in the festival are Orisha’s Journey, an African tale of a girl named Orisha who journeys into the spirit world; Two Spirit, a reflection on the term indicating someone of native descent who possesses both male and female spirits; Mahogany Too, an experimental Nollywood sequel to the lustrous 1975 Diana Ross drama. Other works visualize the snapping boasts of Muhammad Ali; elegantly explore Brazillian dance and Yoruba spirituality through hand-painted animation; and showcase the trials of a black queer youth who tries to find acceptance. Foregrounding artists of African and Indigenous/Native descent, the screening features works from around the world, and the possibilities of science fiction courses through the veins of all three screenings.

With films by Adrian Baker, Donovan Vim Crony, Sergio Di Bitetto, Hannah R.W. Hamalian, Carrie Hawks, Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil & Jackson Polys, Elizabeth LaPensée, Laura Marguiles, Lucas Martell, Everard McBain, Teouria Morris, Abdul Ndadi, Akosua Adoma Owusu, Ibrahim Waziri, Don Jonathan Webb, and Jin Woo.

 

Orisha’s Journey by Abdul Ndadi

Hepa! by Laura Margulies

Plugin by Sergio Di Bitetto

Beautiful, by Jin Woo

Screening 1 Program

Hepa! by Laura Margulies
6:30min, 16mm on digital, 1998
Award winning (NYFA and Dance Films Association), Hepa! played at the Sundance film festival. It is a hand painted, animated exploration into Brazilian Capoeira, dance, Orishas and drum. Live action footage blended with animation. Featuring Marivaldo Dos Santos of Stomp.

Celflux Reluctant Heroes Trailer by Everard McBain
1:45min, digital, 2017
The trailer for the upcoming animated series Celflux.

Plugin by Sergio Di Bitetto
4:29min, digital, 2014
Plugin is the story of a mechanical city in which every citizen is a part of the city itself, responsible for generating lights by connecting the male and female parts of the mechanism. Everyone seems to fit into this perfect puzzle except the main character, G-O, a man who does not match the rest of his world. G-O finally finds his perfect match – another man – but the City Authority try to stop this uncommon union. It is up to G-O and Ico to show their city that every connection is after all part of the same energy – love.

Muhammad Ali – “How Great I Am” (Animated) by Don Jonathan David Webb
1min, digital, closed captioned, 2017
Muhammad Ali was so much more than a professional boxer, he was a global icon, civil-rights activist, and an American hero.
The audio used in this animation was from a 1974 event promoting the upcoming Ali-Foreman fight (aka “The Rumble in the Jungle”).
Ali’s use of poetry, language and humor was a tool he utilized to build momentum, and in a sense, to proclaim victory in his upcoming fights.
This animated video is dedicated to him. The Greatest!

The Violence of a Civilization without Secrets by Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil, Jackson Polys
10min, digital, 2017
An urgent reflection on indigenous sovereignty, the undead violence of museum archives, and postmortem justice through the case of the “Kennewick Man,” a prehistoric Paleo-American man whose remains were found in Kennewick, Washington, in 1996.

Annie & Dave by Teouria Morris
2:50min, digital, 2018
Within a classroom at North Ridge High sits Annie, a girl with a big appetite and Dave, a quiet misunderstood boy. Over the course of the class Annie’s eating gets Dave in trouble repeatedly with their strict teacher, who tolerates no disobedience from her students. In the end a truce is formed, a new friendship is beginning and sharing food is tolerated.

Orisha’s Journey by Abdul Ndadi
5:20, digital, 2014
Based on African folklore; “Orisha’s Journey” is the fantasy tale of a girl called Orisha, who ventures into the spirit world and must learn the importance of remembering her roots.

emptying, to make room for overflowing by Hannah R.W. Hamalian
5min, digital, 2017
What if there are really gleaming cities hung upside-down over the desert sand? A girl contends with her fate by taking on a var hiiety of forms. A cube becomes a vessel, a site of transformation, a container of the universe.

Mahogany Too by Akosua Adoma Owusu
3min, Super-8mm on digital, 2018
Inspired by Nollywood’s distinct re-imagining in the form of sequels, Mahogany Too, interprets the 1975 cult classic, Mahogany, a fashion-infused romantic drama. Starring Nigerian actress Esosa E., Mahogany Too, examines and revives Diana Ross’ iconic portrayal of Tracy Chambers, a determined and energetic African-American woman enduring racial disparities while pursuing her dreams. Mahogany Too uses analog film to achieve its vintage tones which emphasizes the essence of the character, re-creating Tracy’s qualities through fashion, modeling, and styling.

Aquarium by Hannah R.W. Hamalian
4:46min, digital, 2018
The composition of the human body is interpreted through fractal geometric shapes, which are released into pulsating movements. A monochromatic visual world pairs with a fragmented soundtrack to speculate about the possibility of cohesion. Limbs and pieces assemble and disassemble within a red pool, as desire for unity is mediated.

NOISE GATE by Donovan Vim Crony
8min, digital, 2013
NOISE GATE is an experimental sci-fi short film about a dimensional traveling Scientist who is in search of the ultimate reality. His only passage into that realm is something called the NOISE GATE.

Screening 2 Program

Hepa! by Laura Margulies
6:30min, 16mm on digital, 1998
Award winning (NYFA and Dance Films Association), Hepa! played at the Sundance film festival. It is a hand painted, animated exploration into Brazilian Capoeira, dance, Orishas and drum. Live action footage blended with animation. Featuring Marivaldo Dos Santos of Stomp.

Celflux Reluctant Heroes Trailer by Everard McBain
1:45min, digital, 2017
The trailer for the upcoming animated series Celflux.

Annie & Dave by Teouria Morris
2:50min, digital, 2018
Within a classroom at North Ridge High sits Annie, a girl with a big appetite and Dave, a quiet misunderstood boy. Over the course of the class Annie’s eating gets Dave in trouble repeatedly with their strict teacher, who tolerates no disobedience from her students. In the end a truce is formed, a new friendship is beginning and sharing food is tolerated.

Bino and Fino – The Mighty Walls of Benin by Ibrahim Waziri
11min, digital, closed captioned, 2014
A Nigerian cartoon teaching children around the world about African culture and much more.

The Path Without End by Elizabeth LaPensee
05:55min, digital, 2011
Anishinaabe stories of the Moon People are retold through the experimental stop motion animation The Path Without End directed and animated by Elizabeth LaPensée with music by Cree cellist Cris Derksen. Premiered at imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival 2011. Curated for Museum of Contemporary Native Art’s Turtle Island Rising: Past and Futures Program, Aboriginal Pavilion 2015, and Festival Ciné Alter’Natif 2016 in France.

Muhammad Ali – “How Great I Am” (Animated) by Don Jonathan David Webb
1min, digital, closed captioned, 2017
Muhammad Ali was so much more than a professional boxer, he was a global icon, civil-rights activist, and an American hero.
The audio used in this animation was from a 1974 event promoting the upcoming Ali-Foreman fight (aka “The Rumble in the Jungle”).
Ali’s use of poetry, language and humor was a tool he utilized to build momentum, and in a sense, to proclaim victory in his upcoming fights.
This animated video is dedicated to him. The Greatest!

Orisha’s Journey by Abdul Ndadi
5:20, digital, 2014
Based on African folklore; “Orisha’s Journey” is the fantasy tale of a girl called Orisha, who ventures into the spirit world and must learn the importance of remembering her roots.

Two Spirit by Adrian Baker
4:10min, digital, 2013
Two Spirit: A person of First Nations or Native American descent possessing both a male and female spirit. An umbrella term used to describe the fluidity of First Nations/Native American gender identity and sexuality with respect to traditional tribal roles. Featuring: Mica Valdez (Mexica), Nazbah Tom (Navajo/Diné), Arlando Teller (Navajo/Diné), Charlie Ballard (Anishinaabe, Sac & fox), Esther Lucero (Navajo/Diné).

emptying, to make room for overflowing by Hannah R.W. Hamalian
5min, digital, 2017
What if there are really gleaming cities hung upside-down over the desert sand? A girl contends with her fate by taking on a var hiiety of forms. A cube becomes a vessel, a site of transformation, a container of the universe.

The OceanMaker by Lucas Martell
10min, digital, 2014
After the seas have disappeared, a courageous pilot fights against vicious sky pirates for control of the last remaining source of water: the clouds.

Screening 3 Program

Hepa! by Laura Margulies
6:30min, 16mm on digital, 1998
Award winning (NYFA and Dance Films Association), Hepa! played at the Sundance film festival. It is a hand painted, animated exploration into Brazilian Capoeira, dance, Orishas and drum. Live action footage blended with animation. Featuring Marivaldo Dos Santos of Stomp.

Beautiful, by Jin Woo
7:40min, digital, 2014
This picture portrays the society’s heavy influence on the unification of individual characters in this world.

Plugin by Sergio Di Bitetto
4:29min, 2014, digital
Plugin is the story of a mechanical city in which every citizen is a part of the city itself, responsible for generating lights by connecting the male and female parts of the mechanism. Everyone seems to fit into this perfect puzzle except the main character, G-O, a man who does not match the rest of his world. G-O finally finds his perfect match – another man – but the City Authority try to stop this uncommon union. It is up to G-O and Ico to show their city that every connection is after all part of the same energy – love.

Orisha’s Journey by Abdul Ndadi
5:20min, digital, 2014
Based on African folklore; “Orisha’s Journey” is the fantasy tale of a girl called Orisha, who ventures into the spirit world and must learn the importance of remembering her roots.

Muhammad Ali – “How Great I Am” (Animated) by Don Jonathan David Webb
1min, digital, closed captioned, 2017
Muhammad Ali was so much more than a professional boxer, he was a global icon, civil-rights activist, and an American hero.
The audio used in this animation was from a 1974 event promoting the upcoming Ali-Foreman fight (aka “The Rumble in the Jungle”).
Ali’s use of poetry, language and humor was a tool he utilized to build momentum, and in a sense, to proclaim victory in his upcoming fights.
This animated video is dedicated to him. The Greatest!

Celflux Reluctant Heroes Trailer by Everard McBain
1:45min, digital, 2017
The trailer for the upcoming animated series Celflux.

Buried by Adrian Baker
3:10min, digital, 2013
Buried: Ohlone activist and educator Corinna Gould talks about the destruction of sacred sites, with a focus on the shellmounds in the San Francisco Bay Area of California.

The Violence of a Civilization without Secrets by Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil, Jackson Polys
10min, digital, 2017
An urgent reflection on indigenous sovereignty, the undead violence of museum archives, and postmortem justice through the case of the “Kennewick Man,” a prehistoric Paleo-American man whose remains were found in Kennewick, Washington, in 1996.

black enuf* by Carrie Hawks
22:16min, digital, closed-captioned, 2016
A queer oddball seeks approval from black peers despite a serious lack of hip-hop credentials. This short animated documentary takes you on a quest for belonging.

Bio of the curator

Savion “Ineil Quaran” Mingo is an afro-futurist multidisciplinary artist and ghetto organizer born in Buffalo, NY and raised in the Kenfield/Langfield Projects. Through his fine art and multimedia collages he recreates memories and dreamscapes incorporating themes of self-preservation, Black celebration, imagination, and grief. He developed his skill by blocking-out neighborhood sidewalks with chalk drawings and studying digital tutorials. Institutionally he attended Buffalo Academy of Visual Performing Arts and briefly, Villa Maria College majoring in animation. Growing up Ineil indulged in: Walt Disney animations, climbing trees, the epics of ancient religions and folklore, anime, early 2000’s hip hop and R&B, science fiction adventure, and his gullah/geechee heritage.

In 2014 he co-owned, graphic design business and zine distributor, VENT. Soon after in 2015 he co-founded D.O.P.E. Collective (Dismantling Oppressive Patterns for Empowerment), a Black youth-led anti-oppressive arts organization that aims to strengthen  local resources for creative and exploited communities which resists through art forms and arts movements considered: white-washed, extreme, stigmatized, political, and/or experimental.

Ineil Quaran is now developing work for his first solo art show and is continuing to cultivate resources supporting the East Side, melaninated creatives, and all the black and brown *QTs!

*QT = queer and trans people

Bios of the artists

Over the past two decades Adrian Baker has produced, written and directed numerous projects for television and the web, including the award-winning animated poetry series SlamBox, which was produced in partnership with Youth Speaks. As Creative Director for MadLab Creative his client list included DreamWorks Records, Sony Screenblast, and Wild Brain Animation. Adrian’s current project is Injunuity, an episodic documentary using a unique mix of animation, music and real audio to explore modern American life from a contemporary Native American perspective, which aired nationally on PBS in November, 2013 and has been seen (in part or whole) in numerous film festivals worldwide. Injunuity 2.0 is now in production. The project also includes an educational portal and is being produced in partnership with the Independent Television Service (ITVS) and Vision Maker Media. In addition to his animation, Adrian has also worked extensively in the education field as a teacher, mentor and coach, has published several pieces of short fiction and has optioned a feature length screenplay. Currently Adrian lives in Oakland, California with his wife and daughter.”

Donovan Vim Crony is a film/TV Producer and visual artist living and working in Los Angeles. His work focuses on fusing themes of rock & roll and speculative fiction (sci-fi, horror, fantasy) in contemporary and dystopian societies. His visual art style is highly influenced by comic book and anime culture as seen through the lens of the African diaspora. For more information on Donovan Vim Crony, visit www.vimcrony.com. IG: @VimCrony

Sergio Di Bitetto is an Italian animator and designer born in a small town of the south of Italy who has always dreamed to work in the Cartoons industry. Grew up with Disney’s classical feature films and Japanese anime, he developed his skills attending an artistic high school, then moving to Milan where he obtained his degree in Media design and Multimedia Arts. After graduating he had the chance to enter in the business as motion graphic designer and compositor, working for many Italian and international brands in the TV and video commercial industry. After three years of work experience in this field, he decided to go back to his passion for animation, moving to Canada where he attended the Classical Animation program at Vancouver Film School. He’s now currently working the animation industry in Canada, while trying to pursuing his childhood dream to tell story that will inspire the world.

Hannah R.W. Hamalian is a filmmaker engaged in demonstrating complexity in order to point to the richness of life. Through animation, live action, and appropriated video, she asks questions of herself and her viewers in order to untangle the forces that shape people into who they are. Interpreting being as a daily process of renewal rather than a static mode, her work often centers the body as a site of transformation. She is drawn to motion and immersive soundscapes as tools to create experiences of expanded possibility. She is currently based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin where she is an instructor in the Film department at UW-Milwaukee.

Carrie Hawks harnesses the magic of animation to tell stories. The artist works in a variety of medium including drawing, doll-making, and performance. Their work addresses gender, sexuality, and race. They have shown in New York, Atlanta, Kansas City, Toronto, and Tokyo. They hold a BA in Art History & Visual Arts from Barnard College and a BFA in Graphic Design from Georgia State University. Their first film, Delilah, won the Best Experimental Award at the Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival (2012). Their films have screened at BlackStar Film Festival (Philadelphia), CinemAfrica (Stockholm, Sweden), and MIX Queer Experimental Film Festival (New York). black enuf* won the ‘Best Animation’ at Reel Sisters of the Diaspora, and ‘Best Women’s Short Film-Audience Award’ at the 30th Annual Out on Film Festival in Atlanta, Georgia.

Adam Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist. He attempts to subvert traditional forms of ethnography through humor, relation, and transgression. His and his brother Zack’s work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, UnionDocs, e-flux, and the Walker Art Center.

Zack Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist. His work centers on indigenous narratives in the present—and looks towards the future—through the use of innovative nonfiction forms. Along with his brother Adam, he is a Gates Millennium Scholar, UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow, and current Sundance Native Film Fellow.

Elizabeth LaPensée, Ph.D. is an award-winning designer, writer, artist, and researcher who creates and studies Indigenous-led media such as games and comics. She is an Assistant Professor of Media & Information and Writing, Rhetoric & American Cultures at Michigan State University. Most recently, she designed and created art for Thunderbird Strike (2017), a lightning-searing side-scroller game which won Best Digital Media at imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival.

Laura Marguiles began animating in 1988 as a means to combine her love of dance and art. Animation has continued to inspire Laura, who has spent over twenty five years exploring paint in motion. Her personal films have been screened worldwide in film festivals (Sundance, Ann Arbor, Margaret Mead, Anima Munde, Asifa, New York Children’s Film Festival, and Cardiff International Film Festival, Hawaii International Film Festival, Honolulu Museum of Art, etc) and her commissioned work has aired nationwide (PBS, CBS, MTV, VH1, Sundance Channel etc.). She has received awards and grants from Cinedance Film Festival, Broadcast Design, Asifa East, Ann Arbor, and Creativity Magazine, New York University, the New York Foundation for the Arts, Dance Films Association, Te PEW Charitable Funds. Besides creating her own flms, Laura has worked as a designer and colorist at MTV Animation on the classics Te Head, Beavis and Butthead and Daria and as a freelance illustrator, animator and artist. Laura has taught animation at Pratt, New York Film Academy, School of Visual Arts, Punahou School, I’olani School, Hawaii Women in Filmmaking  and at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts where she was on the faculty and taught for thirteen years. She has been teaching animation at the Academy of Creative Media at the University of Hawaii since 2015. She continues to work on freelance jobs. Most recently she supervised the animation as well as creating animation for a collaborative event Symphony of Birds at Blaisdell Cancert Hall in Honolulu. “

Lucas Martell’s first short film Pigeon: Impossible has been shown in over 250 festivals in 43 countries, and won more than 20 awards including Best Short at the Montreal World Film Festival and Best in Show at ArtFutura in Spain. The film was also a viral hit online, having passed 11 million views on YouTube alone. Since Pigeon: Impossible, Lucas has developed several feature animation projects and runs Mighty Coconut, a full- service animation studio in Austin, Texas. The OceanMaker is his second 3D animated film.

Everard McBain is the Creative Director and CEO of GemGfx. GemGfx is a multidisciplinary design consultancy based in Trinidad and Tobago. He has been involved in the field of Graphic Design for over 14 years. He is also the art director and co-author of the graphic novel Celflux which he created along with his wife Dixie Ann Archer-McBain.

Born in Buffalo, NY, Teouria Morris’s ultimate goal would be to live in a world filled with free Hamilton tickets, swarms of puppies, and lakes full of chocolate. A senior at Villa Maria College, Teouria, is an artist, animator, and a visual development artist. Originally wanting to pursue only Animation, she was eventually won over by the beauty of environments such as Tarzan and Big Hero 6. When shes not drawing or creating interesting characters, she can be found eating or dancing around the classroom, usually on a sugar-rush.

Abdul Ndadi is an independent animator of Ghanaian descent living in New York City. He graduated from the School of Visual Arts in 2013. His animated short Orisha’s Journey (based on African folklore) premiered in Japan at the Hiroshima International Animation Festival and screened at over 50 film festivals across the globe. A believer in the strength of the human spirit to overcome all adversities, with his work he’d like to give a platform for those who feel voiceless and help build a bridge of common understanding for all people. Abdul works as a freelance artist for film and commercial productions.

Akosua Adoma Owusu (born January 1, 1984) is a Ghanaian-American filmmaker, producer and cinematographer whose films address the collision of identities, where the African immigrant located in the United States has a “triple consciousness.” Owusu interprets Du Bois’ notion of double consciousness and creates a third cinematic space or consciousness, representing diverse identities including feminism, queerness and African immigrants interacting in African, white American, and black American culture. Her films have screened internationally including Rotterdam, Rencontres Internationales Paris/Berlin, Toronto, New Directors/New Films, BFI London Film Festival and San Francisco International Film Festival among others. She was a featured artist at the 56th Robert Flaherty Seminar programmed by renowned film critic Dennis Lim. In 2015, she was named by Indiewire as one of 6 preeminent Avant-Garde Female Filmmakers Who Redefined Cinema. Currently, she divides her time between Ghana and New York, where she works as a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.

Jackson Polys is a visual artist who seeks to dissolve artificial boundaries between perceptions of traditional Native art forms, practices, and contemporary life. He holds an MFA in visual arts from Columbia University. He is the recipient of a 2017 NACF Mentor Artist Fellowship and is advisor to Indigenous New York at the Vera List Center.

Ibrahim Waziri Teaching Children About Africa & The World: There’s always something new going on as the world around them hurtles on and changes. With Bino and Fino’s curiosity and thirst for learning there is always something new to discover.  It could be an African dish, an animal, a heavy tropical lightning storm, a country,a fruit, a word in an African language, a musical instrument, African geography, a folktale… Featured in ​Huffington Post​ , ​Blavity​ and ​CNN​. With over 2 million ​Youtube​ Views, public screenings in over 7 countries, customers in over 10 countries Bino and Fino opens up a fantastic world of learning for children. The show has been embraced by parents and educators in countries like the USA as a genuine way to teach about diversity, Africa and more. 

Don Jonathan Webb uses his passion for history to tell stories that highlight and honor the richness of the African-American experience. Using 2D animation he creates short vignettes that seek to educate, inspire and entertain viewers.

Jin Woo is an independent short animation director since 2012. VJ. Went to Krakow ASP 2016 dropped off in 2017. Graduate from Kaywon Art School 2012. Born and grew up in S.Korea but also lived in the different countries as an outsider.